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Elder Abuse

What is Elder Abuse?

Elder Abuse is any action which causes harm to or neglect of an older person. It can take the form of physical abuse (defined as any violent act that causes physical injury and/or taking the form of neglect), psychological abuse (such as name calling, treating older people like children, scolding or denying access to friends and family) or financial abuse (i.e., when seniors are forced to sign over control of their money, homes, assts or wills).

The most scary part of Elder Abuse is that it is often perpetrated by a care giver, neighbor, family member of close friend.

Some Facts and Myths About Elder Abuse

Fact

  • Victims and abusers come from all geographic, economic, social and cultural backgrounds
  • Victims may not disclose abuse because they feel ashamed, guilty, fearful, or they wish to protect the abuser
  • Victims often rationalize their abuse by blaming themselves in the belief that they once hurt the abuser

Myth

  • Older people could leave if they want to
  • Spousal abuse stops at the age of 60
  • Older people are usually sick, frail and need care

So How Can Crime Stoppers Help?

People often feel that Elder Abuse is a family matter or fear that interference will make the problem worse. These attitudes only enable the problem to get worse and consequences to those we should respect most in our society could be fatal.

If you have any information about Elder Abuse and we encourage you to report it to Crime Stoppers by calling the toll free tips line anytime at 1-800-222-8477(TIPS). Your call will always remain anonymous and you may be eligible for a cash reward.

  • Secure Tip

  • Text Tip



    Anonymous Text TIPS
  • Statistics Since 1987

    Total
    Tips Received 91,696
    Fugitives Arrested 403
    Cases Cleared 5468
    Property Recovered $3,947,841
    Drugs Seized $10,331,277
    Awards Paid $244,000
    Charges Laid 6339
    Proceeds of Crime $452,616
  • Canada Calling

    News for Canadian Crime Stoppers
    Spring 2013 Issue


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